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Posts Tagged ‘#hospitals’

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Hackers Split On ‘Ethics’ Of Ransomware Attacks On Hospitals

September 14, 2016

Ransomware might be lucrative for some cybercriminals, but there are those who condemn holding hospitals to ransom.

Ransomware attacks against hospitals represent a growing threat which is becoming increasingly lucrative for some cybercriminals — even while other hackers are openly condemning extortion attempts against healthcare providers.
A combination of hospitals’ reliance on equipment powered by older operating systems and their often very urgent need to access medical data means that some hackers have looked at the institutions as a potentially rich target.
That was demonstrated when a Los Angeles hospital paid a $17,000 Bitcoin ransom after a Locky infection took down its network. But that wasn’t a one-off attack: there’s been a surge in ransomware-based cyberattacks against hospital networks across the globe, but particularly in the US.
Cybersecurity researchers from Intel Security analysed ransomware code from attacks against hospitals made during the first quarter of the year and discovered numerous Bitcoin wallets used to transfer ransom payments — Bitcoin having become the preferred currency of the cybercriminal — which showed that the hackers behind these hospitals attacks had amassed $100,000 from ransoms alone.
Researchers have described the ransomware attack methods used by such attackers as “effective but not very sophisticated”. While they don’t specify which variants of ransomware are being used, the description could point to the culprits using something like Cerber, which has been seen being made available as a ransomware-as-a-service scheme for use by even the most technically-illiterate wannabe cybercriminal.
Researchers also suggest the hospital attacks weren’t carried out by the sort of “malicious actors we normally face in ransomware attacks or breaches”.
Indeed, they found evidence that suggests that cyberattacks against hospitals are being carried out by those viewed as renegades even within the cybercriminal fraternity, judged negatively for their decision to carry out attacks against those which provision healthcare. In the Russian underground in particular, there’s an ‘ethical’ code of conduct which places hospitals off-limits — even in countries usually targeted by Russian-speaking hackers.
In one forum, criminals discussed the ethics of attacking hospitals at length: “Yes, this is pretty sad and a new low. These ransom attacks are bad enough, but if someone were to die or be injured because of this it is just plain wrong,” one user said, while another labelled hospital attackers as “dumbest hackers ever”.
While hospitals currently only account for a small percentage of ransomware victims, it’s feared that as ransomware becomes an increasingly appealing method of attack for hackers, more and more of them will attack the healthcare sector.
“With cybersecurity threats including ransomware rising at such a rapid rate, organisations are having to come to terms with the fact that it’s fast becoming a question of ‘when’, not ‘if’, they suffer a breach,” says Raj Samani, CTO at EMEA Intel Security. “It’s crucial that the likes of healthcare pick up the pace with cybersecurity. Vulnerabilities in these sectors provide hackers with access to extremely personal, valuable and often irreplaceable data and IP.”
Despite a few high profile cases, Intel Security researchers found that, in most instances, hospitals that became victims of ransomware didn’t pay hackers a ransom. In these cases, it’s likely that organisations found another way to decrypt the files — or they simply deemed the encrypted files to not be important enough to pay to get back.
Cybersecurity researchers and the authorities have both warned about the increasing threat of ransomware to corporate and public sector networks.

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Ransomware Targets UK Hospitals, But NHS Won’t Pay Up

August 31, 2016

Ransomware has caused massive headaches for hospitals. In February of this year, at least a dozen hospitals around the world had been seriously infected with malware demanding cash to retrieve their files. Some even resorted to pen-and-paper systems, and others gave the hackers over $10,000 worth of bitcoin to unlock their systems.
But judging by responses to Freedom of Information requests, UK hospitals are not paying hackers when ransomware strikes.
Motherboard asked National Health Service (NHS) trusts for details on attack figures and payments stretching back to January 2012. Many had been successfully hacked at some point (although on a limited scale, infecting only a small number of computers). Another piece of research carried out by cybersecurity company NCC Group found nearly half of 60 NHS Trusts suffered a ransomware attack in the last year.
All of the hospitals that said they had been successfully infected with ransomware said they had not paid the attackers
But successful infections are not necessarily the most important thing here. Successful payments are: a ransomware operator gets nothing for their time and effort if the victim doesn’t cough up the bitcoin. If a hospital hasn’t paid a hacker, presumably it has managed to protect patient or other files from permanent loss.
That’s exactly what many of the hospitals contacted by Motherboard did. All of the hospitals that said they had been successfully infected with ransomware said they had not paid the attackers.
The East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust said it had faced two successful infections of “Crypto Locker,” a particularly popular form of ransomware. “In both cases for the Trust, we did not pay the ransom, we simply recovered the data from an internal backup,” Freedom of Information Officer Jude Archer wrote in her response. “We backup all Trust data each and every day. I can confirm that there is no evidence the data that was encrypted [by the ransomware] was copied or moved off site at any time.”
The Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) had the same strategy, and added that it has a policy of not paying attackers.
“According to records HSCIC has been infected with ransomware on 3 occasions since January 2012, in every instance HSCIC has been prepared for this eventuality and has been able to contain and eradicated the ransomware infection and restore all affected systems and files from full backups, without any breaches to patient data or disruptions to the delivery of patient care,” Information Governance Advisor Graeme Holmes wrote in his response.
The NHS may have a decent track record of not paying hackers, but clearly there is still money to be made elsewhere: Earlier this month, researchers from FireEye spotted an uptick in the number of Locky infections hitting US-based hospitals.

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Are Unsecure Medical Devices Opening the Backdoor for Hackers?

August 17, 2016

The increased adoption of connected devices into medical services and processes is streamlining and improving the manner in which medicine can be tracked, developed, sourced and distributed.
On call/off site medical staff are also able to access information and source medicine on site, improving service levels and productivity. However, the exponential advantages of integrating connected devices into this industry can potentially open up points of vulnerability which should increase security fears for decision makers.
The biggest threat to any organization, large or small, is understanding who actually has access to information and at what levels they can access the network. With the Internet of Things (IoT), access can come in many shapes and sizes, from an off site doctor accessing medical history and prescription requirements to ambulance and emergency staff needing to log cases.
Medical/health institutions must prioritize the management of user access if they want to ensure they have the adequate security levels around these access points. The variety of job roles that need to access a vast array of files from a connected network will also require different levels of access, for example a doctor on call will need access to all previous medical history and prescription requirements, whereas an on-call care worker may only need medical history and is not qualified to distribute or access prescriptive files.
Therefore organizations must ensure that the right person is accessing the network or device, each time a request takes place with the correct level of attributed trust. However, individual access identification may now not be sufficient enough to fully eliminate security and safety fears in this area.
Although the correct person may have access to a network from a specific place and use the correct logins, there is no guarantee that a rogue infiltrator hasn’t “piggy backed” the connection giving them the same level of access as the individual.
Through effectively moonlighting as the employee or third party, hackers can utilize the open connection to the network to gain the same level of access as the member of staff. This may encourage hackers to potentially target gateway devices such as medical distribution tools that require a network connection. The device in this instance doesn’t hold or contain sensitive information, however it does act as a gateway onto the network.
Now, it is here that access management solutions must be considered to allow damage limitation to take place if a hack does happen, providing granular access controls and monitoring for every access request.
We know hackers use a variety of methods to gain access from rogue emails to downloadable PDF’s that open access to personal and organizational data. However, security implications must also be considered on a more tangible level, in addition to digital and internet driven attacks. If we take reference from the Barclays hack that took place in 2013 and cost the bank £1.3 million, it helps us uncover the level of simplicity, but outright tenacity that some hackers will go to in hope of gaining access to data. This hack saw insiders pose as IT engineers and fitted a device that gave access to its network remotely and allowed them to transfer money into their own accounts.
There are two recommended strategies for organizations to protect themselves against hacks such as this. Firstly, to ensure all staff are trained on the variety of risks that are present when exchanging emails or other digital communications. Secondly, organizations need to protect their networks by securely supervising, auditing and controlling access to their assets, data and IP via a privileged access managed solution.
The increased adoption of connected devices into medical services and processes is streamlining and improving the manner in which medicine can be tracked, developed, sourced and distributed.

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