Have you created a ShazzleMail account on your smartphone? This is a required first step.

Yes No

Free Encrypted Email

shutterstock_104336624

Heartbeat could be used as password to access electronic health records

March 7, 2017

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have devised a new way to protect personal electronic health records using a patient’s own heartbeat.

“The cost and complexity of traditional encryption solutions prevent them being directly applied to telemedicine or mobile healthcare. Those systems are gradually replacing clinic-centered healthcare, and we wanted to find a unique solution to protect sensitive personal health data with something simple, available and cost-effective,” said Zhanpeng Jin, assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Binghamton University. Jin is the co-author of a new paper titled “A Robust and Reusable ECG-based Authentication and Data Encryption Scheme for eHealth Systems.”

Traditional security measures — like cryptography or encryption — can be expensive, time-consuming, and computing-intensive. Binghamton researchers encrypted patient data using a person’s unique electrocardiograph (ECG) — a measurement of the electrical activity of the heart measured by a biosensor attached to the skin — as the key to lock and unlock the files.

“The ECG signal is one of the most important and common physiological parameters collected and analyzed to understand a patient’s’ health,” said Jin. “While ECG signals are collected for clinical diagnosis and transmitted through networks to electronic health records, we strategically reused the ECG signals for the data encryption. Through this strategy, the security and privacy can be enhanced while minimum cost will be added.”

Essentially, the patient’s heartbeat is the password to access their electronic health records.

The identification scheme is a combination of previous work by Jin using a person’s unique brainprint instead of traditional passwords for access to computers and buildings combined with cyber-security work from Guo and Chen.

“This research will be very helpful and significant for next-generation secure, personalized healthcare,” said Jin.

Since an ECG may change due to age, illness or injury — or a patient may just want to change how their records are accessed — researchers are currently working out ways to incorporate those variables.

Assistant Professor Linke Guo and Associate Professor Yu Chen, along with PhD candidates Pei Huang and Borui Li, are co-authors of the paper.

The research was presented at The IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM 2016) in Washington, D.C., in December 2016.

The work is supported by Binghamton University’s Interdisciplinary Collaboration Grant (ICG) program.

Tags: , , , , ,

Introducing ShazzleMail Email and How it Works

Privacy is your Fundamental Human Right.

Our Daily Blog
ph
HACK BRIEF: ONEPLUS PHONES HAVE AN UNFORTUNATE BACKDOOR BUILT IN
November 16, 2017

ONEPLUS SMARTPHONES HAVE developed a bit of a cult following, thanks to a combination of design and ...

Read more
725_ly9jb2ludgvszwdyyxbolmnvbs9zdg9yywdll3vwbg9hzhmvdmlldy9lndczzdrknjc3mjc1ngnkogzjnmfmmmq2owu4nji3ys5qcgc
Experienced IP Litigator, Cybersecurity & Data Privacy Lawyer Gabriel Ramsey Joins Crowell & Moring
November 13, 2017

SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 13, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Crowell & Moring LLP is pleased to announce the add...

Read more
150522100240-amazon-delivery-780x439
Amazon Key’s big privacy test is now in your hands
November 7, 2017

Amazon Key's debut was merciless. People took to social media two weeks ago to deride the new in-...

Read more
pr
Why some privacy experts are spooked by iPhone X’s facial recognition feature
November 2, 2017

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple Inc. won accolades from privacy experts in September for assuring that facia...

Read more
maxresdefault
Always-on Voice Technology Raises Privacy Concerns
October 30, 2017

New technologies positively advertise constant microphone monitoring–but is it what consumers want...

Read more